Pet Eye Infections FAQ


Facts about Pet Eye Infections

Pet Medical Services knows that pets are playful, loyal, and treasured members of your family.  They also depend on you to meet their needs. When their health suffers, you want to bring them to a veterinarian who is experienced in primary care, surgery, and specialty treatments.  A key factor in your veterinarian being able to help your pet in the best way possible is to start with an accurate diagnosis.  As a pet parent, you can play an important role in this by providing information about any behavioral changes and other symptoms you’ve noticed.  Combined with a thorough examination and possibly further tests if needed, you and your veterinarian can discuss options and move forward with the best plan.  Pet Medical Services in Orem, UT, recommends educating yourself about what can go wrong with your pet’s health so you can better recognize symptoms.

Pet Eye Infections FAQ

Q: Aren’t eye infections just non-emergency issues that will probably clear up on their own?

A: Not necessarily.  Eye infections result from a variety of underlying issues, some of which can certainly get worse if left untreated.  You don’t want your pet’s vision to deteriorate because of something that could have been prevented if addressed earlier.  Eye infections can also be indicators of ailments in other parts of the body.

Q: If my pets were playing and one of them accidentally scratched the other’s eye, does that require a visit to the veterinarian?

A: Yes. A veterinarian should examine the eye.  A wound on or near the eye is likely causing a significant amount of pain to your pet as well as give bacteria the opportunity to cause an infection.  A corneal ulcer could develop, which may lead to blindness or loss of the eye if left untreated.  Given immediate attention, however, the eye can recover with corneal repair medication, especially if your pet has a healthy immune system. 

Q: What symptoms will I see if my pet has an eye infection?

A: Indicators of an eye infection can include runny eyes or discharge, a cloudy appearance to the eye, red or swollen eyes, pawing or itching at the eyes, leaving one eye closed or squinting, or if your pet’s pupils (the dark center) stay constantly dilated or constricted all the time.

Q: What other conditions might be causing changes in my pet’s eyes?

A: Hypertension and diabetes are two illnesses that sometimes manifest in an animal’s pupils not narrowing in response to changes in light.  These conditions require medication, so it is worth a visit to the veterinarian if these signs are noted.

Pet Medical Services, your Orem, UT, veterinarian, is ready to help with expert care and valuable information.  Call us and schedule an appointment today!

 

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